Local list

Local List of Information Requirements

The Local List is a list of information that may need to be submitted with your planning application to enable it to be processed. The information requirements will differ depending on the type of application being submitted and the development's location.

The Government requires us to take a proportional approach to our requirements for information. 

This list is reviewed at least every 2 years.

The Local List has been reviewed and the changes that were proposed are effective as of 18th August 2017. These are:

  1. Where it is indicated that an Air Quality Assessment is required, it is recommended that applicants read the Technical Planning Guidance. Then send their proposed methodology for assessing the impact on air quality, by email: environmental.health@calderdale.gov.uk . If agreed, the applicant should submit evidence of this, with their assessment and their application documents for validation.
  2. Minor amendments have been made to the Bat Self Assessment form to clarify what photographs should include and examples of special circumstances.
  3. An incomplete sentence relating to a Coal Risk Assessment has been corrected and a link to the Exemptions List included via the Risk Assessment link.
  4. Reference to an Affordable Housing Contribution has been removed from the Planning Obligations requirement as there is no current policy justification to include it.
  5. The requirement for a Renewable Energy Statement has been removed as the current UDP policy is now out-of-date.

There are 24 sections to the Local list:

1. Air Quality / 2. Application plans / 3. Biodiversity and Geodiversity survey / 4. Coal mining risk assessment report / 5. Economic statement / 6. Flood risk statement / 7. Flood risk sequential and exception test / 8. Foul sewage and drainage assessment / 9. Heritage statement / 10. Land contamination assessment / 11. Land stability / 12. Lighting assessment / 13. Noise assessment / 14. Planning obligations statement / 15. Private water supply16. Structural survey / 17. Surface water drainage assessment / 18. Telecommunications / 19. Town centre uses - impact assessment / 20. Transport assessment and statement / 21. Travel plan / 22. Tree survey and arboreal report / 23. Ventilation and extraction statement / 24. Wind energy applications.

 

1. Air quality

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • All major planning applications, ie:

    • creation of 10 or more new dwellings or residential development sites of 0.5 hectares or more;
    • creation of 1000 square metres or more of new floor space;
    • site area of 1 hectare or more;
    • applications for the winning and working of minerals and associated landfill operations.

    Also minor applications (excluding adverts, applications relating to trees, Listed Building Consent applications and householder applications) where the application site falls within the boundary of an air quality management area.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant (see previous rows).

What information is required

An air quality impact assessment.

Note: Please read the guidance, visit: Air quality and emissions: Technical planning guidance (part of the West Yorkshire low emissions strategy) . Then send your proposed methodology for assessing the impact on air quality, by email: environmental.health@calderdale.gov.uk .

If acceptable, submit your assessment, include evidence of Environmental Health’s agreement to your methodology, with your planning application documents.

Further information

The National planning policy framework (NPPF) requires development proposals to demonstrate support for sustainable transport, the transition to low carbon futures, to make fullest use of public transport, walking and cycling and to take account of local health strategies. Providing the basic mitigation measures relevant to Type 1, 2 and 3 developments will help to satisfy those requirements.

Section 5 and Appendix 2 of the Air quality and emissions: Technical planning guidance (part of the West Yorkshire low emissions strategy) set out where an Air quality impact assessment is needed and how to carry one out. This is because of the sensitive location or nature of development. The outcome will determine the level of additional mitigation, and other submissions (eg travel plans) and actions required to satisfy the requirements of the NPPF.

Note that paragraph 124 of the NPPF requires that any new development in an Air quality management area (AQMA) is consistent with the Air quality action plan (AQAP). Calderdale’s AQAP was revised in 2009 and is being rewritten in 2015. During this period, compliance with the 'Air quality and emissions – Technical planning guidance' will be taken as satisfying the aims of the action plan.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone an Environmental Health Officer on: 01422 392373 / 392307 / 392311.

 

2. Application plans

Policy drivers

Type of application

For all applications where new building work is proposed.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

To ensure we have adequate plans to assess an application we require, where relevant, existing and proposed plans of:

  • elevations;
  • floor plans;
  • site section;
  • finished floor and site levels;
  • roof plans;
  • the relationship to adjoining development, including levels, where this could be affected by the proposal.

These must be in a standard metric scale of 1:50, or 1:100. This is required for all applications.

Further information

Note: Copies of the submitted plans are not issued with the decision. It is the applicant's or agent's responsibility to record which plans have been submitted and subsequent amendments. The decision notice will identify which plans the decision has been based upon.

Existing and proposed elevations should be drawn to a scale of 1:50 or 1:100. They must clearly show the proposed works in relation to what is already there, with all sides of the proposal shown. These should indicate, where possible, the proposed building materials and the style, materials and finish of windows and doors. Blank elevations must also be included, if only to show that this is, in fact, the case.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact the Planning section .

 

3. Biodiversity / geodiversity survey

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • All planning applications likely to affect protected species;

  • All planning applications likely to affect protected sites and habitats.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

Assessments of impacts and proposals for long-term maintenance and management.

Further information

Where a proposed development may have impacts on biodiversity or geodiversity, sufficient information should be provided to enable full consideration of those impacts. Where proposals are being made for mitigation and / or compensation and enhancement measures, information to support those proposals will be needed.

Where appropriate, accompanying plans should indicate any significant wildlife habitats or features present. Also, the location of habitats of any species protected under the:

  • Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981;
  • Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010;
  • Habitats and Species of Principal Importance as defined under S41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006; or
  • Protection of Badgers Act 1992.

Calderdale's PDFBiodiversity Action Plan [PDF 1073KB] identifies local Habitats and Species of Principal Importance. This can help inform the need for and scope of any ecological assessment and enhancement measures.

Applications for development with potential impacts on semi-natural habitats will need to include:

  • assessments of impacts;
  • mitigation measures; and
  • proposals for long-term maintenance / management and enhancement.

Habitats include:

  • ancient woodland and rivers;
  • areas designated for their biodiversity interest;
  • Habitats of Principal Importance.

Landscape schemes should adhere to these principles. For details of the Species and Habitats of Principal Importance to the area, read: Biodiversity Action Plan .

Further guidance on what planting may be appropriate to a certain area, can be found at Flora locale  , or by using the Botanical Society for Britain and Ireland (BSBI) Vice county census catalogue . Select South-west Yorkshire (63) from the list of Vice-counties and Native plants when using the search.

Certain proposals, including: demolition of buildings / roof spaces, removal of trees, scrub, hedgerows, or alterations to water courses / ponds may affect protected species. You must provide information on them, any potential impacts for them and mitigating proposals for such impacts.

Natural England provides information on some of the protected species most often affected by development. They give standing advice regarding survey information and mitigation required. Further guidance on when surveys are likely to be needed can be found in Biodiversity and geological conservation validation checklist .

Ecological reports should meet the Guidelines for Ecological Report Writing, published by the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management.

National policies for biodiversity are set out in Circular:

Bat surveys

  • Bat species use a range of roosts, including buildings, trees and underground sites. Some species are particularly associated with the built environment for breeding and hibernating. Bats often use linear features, such as tree lines as foraging or commuting routes. Loss or disruption of these routes may affect bat populations, even if roost sites are unaffected. Developers should be mindful of the impact of external lighting on bats, which can also act to fragment routes. For more information, visit: Bat conservation trust: Lighting ;
  • Bats are ‘reasonably likely’ to roost close to woodland, water or in certain structures, such as barns, in areas below 300m. For further information and maps, visit: Planning issues: bats ;
  • Bats are a material consideration when deciding whether to grant planning permission. If there is a ‘reasonable likelihood’ that bats roost at the site, you must submit a PDFBat roost potential assessment form [PDF 99KB] . If the assessment determines that you will require a survey, it should be undertaken by suitably experienced and licensed surveyors. this is in line with the 'Minimum Standards for Bat Surveys in West Yorkshire' published by West Yorkshire Ecology Service ;
  • It may not be possible to undertake a full bat survey during the months from October to April. This means there may be insufficient information to determine an application. However, where it can be established that there is limited bat roost potential, or impacts can be avoided, it can be possible to validate applications. For more 'Guidance on Winter Bat Surveys', visit: West Yorkshire Ecology Service ;
  • The presence of bats within, or adjacent to, the development site is unlikely to stop the development going ahead. Providing that appropriate mitigation measures are in place. Mitigation is usually the term used for the combination of avoidance measures. These can be: careful timing to avoid the impacts, actions to limit the impact and compensation to create replacement habitat;
  • If a bat roost is likely to be affected, a developer has a legal duty to carry out agreed measures to ensure that bats continue to roost at the site after the development has taken place. This is likely to need a licence from Natural England in addition to a valid planning permission;
  • For further information or advice about bats, visit: Natural England .

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Conservation Officer on: 01422 284430.

 

4. Coal mining risk assessment report

Policy drivers

Type of application

All non householder applications in Coal Authority interactive map viewer .

Geographical locations where this information is required

Visit: Coal Authority interactive map viewer .

What information is required

A desk based Coal mining risk assessment should be prepared by a suitably qualified and competent person.

Further information

The desk-based Coal mining risk assessment should be prepared by a suitably qualified and competent person (see extract from former PPG 14 Development on unstable land for definition). It should contain:

 

  • site specific coal mining information including past / present / future underground mining, shallow coal workings (recorded or probable), mine entries (shafts and adits), mine gas, current licensed areas for coal extraction, any geological features, any recorded surface hazards and past / present surface mining sites (past sites may have used the old style opencast extraction methods);
  • identify what risks these coal mining features, including cumulative effects, pose to the new development;
  • identify how coal mining issues have influenced the proposed development scheme, (e.g. layout) and what mitigation measures will be required to manage those issues and / or whether any changes have been incorporated into the development proposals;
  • confirm whether the prior written permission of the Coal Authority will be required for the site investigations and / or mitigation works;
  • indicate when this permission will be sought.

Any development that involves intrusive activities which intersect, disturb or enter any coal seams, coal mine workings or mine entries require the prior written permission of the Coal Authority in the interests of public safety and state property management.

Note: if the development is subject to the Environmental Impact Assessment process under the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 2011 (as amended), it is suggested that the Coal Mining Risk Assessment can be incorporated into the Environmental Statement.

Where to look for further assistance

 

5. Economic statement

Policy drivers

Replacement Unitary development plan - policies GE1 and E5.

Type of application

Non-employment development, which would result in loss of land or buildings with a lawful use for employment - use classes B1 to B8 or other employment uses.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Sites identified as Primary Employment Areas and New Employment Sites on the .

What information is required

The statement should include justification / evidence as to why the site cannot support an employment use. See Further information for details required in the statement.

Further information

The Statement must include evidence that:

  • demonstrates that the site and / or buildings are not economically or physically capable of supporting industrial, business (use class B1, B2 and B8) or other employment generating uses and that other Unitary Development Plan (UDP) objectives can be achieved by the development;
  • no demand exists to use the site for employment purposes and this is justified by evidence demonstrating the site has been adequately advertised on the open market for at least 12 months with purchase / lease costs set at an appropriate level to reflect the employment potential of the site / building in the local market;
  • the establishment of a new use is the only practical means of retaining a building of architectural or historical significance; and
  • the site forms part of a wider regeneration proposal supported by the Council and an alternative use would be more appropriate and meet other UDP objectives.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Business and Economy on: 01422 392810.

 

6. Flood risk assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

  1. Sites of 1 hectare or more in Flood zone 1;
  2. any development in Flood zones 2 and 3;
  3. any application not falling into types 1 and 2 above for;
    • a change of use to a more vulnerable use, see Further information for definition;
    • a development for 4 or more houses;
    • a development of 100 square metres or more of new non residential floor space; or the creation of 100 square metres or more of, or alteration to, access and car parking;
    • on a site that is at risk from other sources of flooding.

Geographical locations where this information is required

All areas.

What information is required

Application types 1, 2 and 3: evidence that the site meets the Flood risk sequential and exception test (section 7), if appropriate.

and

Your Flood risk assessment (FRA) should identify and assess the risks of all forms of flooding to and from the development, and demonstrate how these risks will be managed, taking climate change into account. The FRA should be proportionate to the scale and nature of the development and the risk. It should describe the design of surface water management including consideration of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and address the requirement for safe access to and from the development in areas at risk of flooding. Finally it should indicate how exceedance flows will be managed on or off site without increasing flood risk.

Further information

Flood Zones

Flood Zones are defined in the Planning practice guidance table 1 and shown on the Environment Agency’s  Flood map for planning (rivers and sea) .

Any area not mapped as Zone 2 or 3 falls within Zone 1.

Vulnerability

Levels of vulnerability are defined in the Planning practice guidance table 2. Compatibility of vulnerable development with flood zone sites is defined in the Planning practice guidance table 3.

Flood Risk Assessments (FRA)

The FRA should be prepared by an applicant in consultation with the local planning authority, with reference to published local development documents and the Calder Valley PDFStrategic flood risk assessment [PDF 629KB] . Note: This document and the associated maps are currently under review.

The Environment Agency provides Flood risk assessment for planning applications on preparing flood risk assessments that are specific to the particular flood zone and type of development.

Flood risk sequential and exception test

Prior to producing a flood risk assessment, it is advisable to ensure that the sequential test has been passed. If there are other available sites at a lower probability of flooding that could accommodate the proposed development, then the sequential test will be failed and a flood risk assessment would be irrelevant. If the application of a sequential test demonstrates that it is not possible to locate the development in a lower flood risk zone, an exception test may then be required.

Note: The Flood Risk Assessment should form part of an Environmental statement, when one is required by the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment (Amended) 2015).

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Drainage Engineer on: 01422 392168, or visit: Environment Agency .

 

Always open first panel: 

7. Flood risk sequential and exception test

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Sequential Test: All relevant applications (changes of use (unless it is to a caravan / mobile home park) and minor applications such as house extensions, adverts, air conditioning units etc are excluded) within flood zones 2, 3a and 3b. Visit: Flood risk assessment for planning applications ;
  • Exception test: Following the application of the Sequential test, an Exception test may be required.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Flood zones 2, 3a and 3b

What information is required

The Sequential test must establish that there are no other reasonably available sites appropriate for the proposed development in areas with a lower probability of flooding as detailed in paragraph 101 of the National planning policy framework. Guidance on the Exceptions test can be found in the National planning policy framework and the Technical guidance to the National planning policy framework.

Further information

Prior to producing a Flood risk assessment for planning applications , it is advisable to first ensure that the Sequential test has been passed. If there are other available sites at a lower probability of flooding that could accommodate the proposed development then the Sequential test will be failed and a Flood risk assessment would be irrelevant. Further information on the Sequential test can be found in the National planning policy framework (section 10, paragraphs 100-102 and the Technical guidance to the National planning policy framework (paragraphs 3-5).

If, following the application of a Sequential test, it is not possible to locate the development in a lower flood risk zone, an Exception test may also be required (see National planning policy framework (section 10, paragraph 102) and the Technical guidance to the National planning policy framework (pages 2- 8).

Evidence that the Sequential test has been passed, and the Exception test requirements have been satisfied, where applicable, will be added to the planning file.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Drainage engineer on: 01422 392168, or visit: Environment Agency .

Also, to review flood risk areas, visit: Flood map for planning (rivers and sea) .

 

8. Foul sewage and drainage assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

Where the development involves the disposal of trade waste or disposal of foul sewage effluent from a toilet, bathroom, shower or kitchen of a house, flat or business including from pubs, hotels and offices.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Parts of the Calderdale area that have no public foul sewerage system.

A development must connect to a public sewer, if within 30 metres of one. Or, within an equivalent distance for developments of more than one property. For example, if within 90m of a public sewer for a development of three properties. To enquire where connections might or might not be possible, visit: Yorkshire Water: Developers help and advice .

What information is required

  • Evidence that no connection to sewer is possible;
  • Details of adequate capacity and suitable location of proposed new or existing septic tanks and treatment plants;
  • Statement as to who is responsible for ongoing maintenance.

Please use the following form (This is the current form that is to be updated to reflect latest legislation / guidance) where it is considered that connection to the Public Sewer is not feasible.

Also, see Further Information, below.

Further information

Non Mains Sewage Disposal (Septic Tanks and Packaged Treatment Plants)

Paragraphs 20 and 21 of the Planning practice guidance: Water supply, wastewater and water quality state that:

“Applications for developments relying on anything other than connection to a public sewage treatment plant, should be supported by sufficient information to understand the potential implications for the water environment.

"Where a connection to a public sewage treatment plant is not feasible a package sewage treatment plant can be considered. (It) should offer treatment so that the final discharge from it meets the standards set by the Environment Agency. A proposal should set out clearly the responsibility and means of operation and management to ensure that the permit is not likely to be infringed in the life of the plant. There may also be effects on amenity and traffic to be considered because of the need for sludge to be removed by tankers.

"Septic tanks should only be considered if it can be clearly demonstrated by the applicant that discharging into a public sewer to be treated at a public sewage treatment works or a package sewage treatment plant is not feasible (taking into account cost and/or practicability).”

‘Non Mains Sewage Disposal’ covers several technologies that remove the solids from sewage and expose the remaining liquor to bacteriological degradation, before discharging the effluent.

Self-contained packaged treatment plants are preferred, because they produce a better quality of effluent prior to discharge. Discharge may be direct to a watercourse, or to a drainage field or drainage mound. For more information, visit: Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H .

Septic tanks only offer basic sewage treatment. They are normally used for small installations, i.e. 1-3 dwellings. They should only be used in conjunction with secondary treatment, such as:

  • a settlement tank, to allow solids in the sewage to settle out;
  • a filter bed to expose the remaining liquor to bacteriological degradation;
  • a soakaway, reed bed or drainage field to distribute liquor over a large area of land, to expose it to further degradation by bacteria in the soil.

For more information, visit: Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H .

Note: The advice elsewhere in this document that restricts / prohibits discharges from septic tanks to watercourses, and for the need for environmental permits (issued by the Environment Agency).

Cesspools are not a treatment system. They simply store sewage prior to treatment and disposal off-site. Calderdale will not grant planning permission for new developments using a cesspool.

Other guidance is available in British Standard BS 6297:2007 (amended 2008) and Building Regulations, visit: Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H .

Sewage treatment works must not cause conditions that are prejudicial to health, or are a nuisance (see Building Act 1984-sections 59 and 126). We want to avoid:

  • neighbouring property being affected by flies and foul odour;
  • water-logging of land or effluent draining onto highways;
  • the pollution of watercourses or the contamination of spring water supplies;
  • harm to sensitive and protected environments and species.

An environmental permit is needed - this is issued by the Environment Agency:

  • to discharge certain quantities of effluent via a septic tank or packaged treatment plant;
  • for tanks and plant and their drainage fields in certain locations. Note a permit will not be granted for a new septic tank to discharge into water. Discharges to water from an existing septic tank will require a permit from 1st January 2020;
  • for all new plants and tanks installed after 1st January 2015. Some existing tanks (if the proposal is to join into one) are covered by exemptions to the need to hold an environmental permit. No new exempted installations can be registered.

A permit is only issued for a septic tank or package treatment plant that complies with regulatory requirements, visit: Septic tanks and treatment plants .

The Local Planning Authority will not approve developments where the basic requirements for obtaining an environmental permit or meeting Building Regulations are unlikely to be met.

Basic requirements for locating a new septic tank or treatment plant

  1. All development from which foul sewage is discharged must connect to a public sewer if within 30 metres of one, or within an equivalent distance for developments of more than one property (i.e. if within 90 metres of a public sewer for a development of three properties). Visit: Building Regulations Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H  to enquire where public sewers might be present.
  2. Building Regulations and British Standards point to certain minimum separation distances. Manufacturer’s recommendations may exceed these:
    • All parts of a waste water treatment system to be at least 7 metres from a habitable building, downslope and downwind of the prevailing wind direction (visit: British Standards (BS) 6297 . Note: In other parts of the UK separation distances of 15 metres are sought between tanks and dwellings);
    • Discharge points from a packaged treatment plant to be at least 10 metres from a watercourse or a building, visit: Building Regulations Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H );
    • Drainage fields or mounds (and for this purpose soakaways and reed beds), to terminate:

      (Visit: Building Regulations Drainage and waste disposal: approved document H ). No new dwelling to be within 15m of an existing cesspool.

      • at least 10 metres away from a water-course or permeable drain;
      • at least 15 metres from a building;
      • at least 50 metres away from a groundwater supply abstraction point, well, spring, borehole used for human consumption;
      • at least 2 metres from site boundary;
      • not to be located in a Zone 1 groundwater protection zone;
      • no driveways, paths etc should cover the disposal area;
      • does not exceed soakage capacity of ground.
  3. Discharges into the ground must be through a drainage field, eg an ‘infiltration system’. Septic Tanks and Packaged treatment plant should not discharge:
    • into the protected area around a water supply (known as ‘source protection zone 1’) – check the Environmental Agency: Groundwater map ;
    • into the ground within 50 metres of a special area of conservation, a special protection area, a Ramsar site or a biological Site of Special Scientific Interest;
    • into the ground within an ancient woodland;
    • within 50 metres of a private water supply for drinking or food production, e.g. a well, spring or borehole.
  4. Discharges into surface water, eg a river or stream. Septic Tanks and Packaged treatment plant should not discharge:
    • into water within 500 metres of a special area of conservation, a special protection area, a Ramsar site, a biological Site of Special Scientific Interest, freshwater pearl mussel population;
    • into water within 200 metres of an aquatic local nature reserve;
    • into water within 50 metres of an aquatic local wildlife site.

    Note: Environmental permits will not be granted for a new septic tank to discharge into water.

    Developers proposing to connect a new development to an existing septic tank or packaged treatment plant

    Developers should be able to demonstrate that the existing tank or plant:

    • was installed according to the manufacturer’s specification (i.e. the instruction manual or technical set of requirements that comes with the equipment);
    • is large enough to handle the load of existing and proposed development;
    • meets the British Standard for septic tanks and sewage treatment plants in force when it was installed (currently BS EN 12566). It should meet those standards if it has a CE mark ;
    • the manual or other documentation that came with the tank or treatment plant has a certificate of compliance with a British Standard;
    • is on the British Water: list of certified equipment ;
    • is in good repair and good working order (if it is not, it will not be granted a permit).

    Note: An Environmental permit will be needed for discharges from an existing septic tank into water, from 1st January 2020.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Drainage Engineer on: 01422 392168, or Pollution Control officer (for non-mains foul drainage) on: 01422 392311 / 392307.

 

9. Heritage statement

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Planning applications affecting a listed building or its setting;
  • planning applications affecting a Conservation Area or its setting;
  • applications for Listed buildings consent;
  • planning applications that involve demolition in a Conservation Area ;
  • planning applications affecting nationally and locally designated parks and gardens;
  • planning applications affecting an Ancient monument or its setting;
  • planning applications affecting non-designated heritage assets that are recorded on the Historic Environment Record, including known archaeological sites.

Geographical locations where this information is required

  • Listed buildings, conservation areas;
  • registered parks and gardens; and
  • scheduled ancient monuments.

What information is required

A description of the significance of any heritage assets affected by the proposal. This includes any contribution made by their setting to that significance. The level of detail should be proportionate to the importance of the heritage asset. See Further information below.

Further information

The scope and degree of detail necessary in a Heritage Statement will vary according to the particular circumstances of each application. Applicants are advised to discuss proposals with either a Planning Officer or a Conservation Officer, before any application is made. The following is a guide to the sort of information that may be required for different types of application:

  • Applications for Listed Building Consent

    The Heritage statement should explain the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the scale, layout and appearance of a proposal. In addition, the statement should include how the proposal has taken account of paragraph 128 of the National Planning Policy Framework. It should describe the significance of the heritage asset and how it is affected by the proposal, including any contribution made by its setting.

    The level of detail provided should be proportionate to the importance of the heritage asset. No more than is sufficient to understand the impact of the proposal on its significance. As a minimum, the relevant Historic environment record (HER) should have been consulted. For the definitive HER for this area, visit: West Yorkshire Archaeology Advisory Service - historic environment record .

    Other sources of information could include:

     

    Information provided in the Heritage Statement could include, where relevant:

    • the list description and listing grade;
    • conservation area if applicable;
    • dated, annotated colour digital photos of the building, site, exterior, interior, specific features, etc;
    • historic maps, archive research, and dates & phasing of the building would be helpful.

    The impact of the proposal on the surviving historic fabric, features and plan form of the building and the site, should be explained in the statement.

    Where a proposal could impact on the special historic or architectural importance of the asset, the statement should explain why the works are necessary. Also, how the approach to the proposal would minimise any harm.

    The justification for the proposed works should also be submitted.

  • Applications for planning permission which involve demolition in a Conservation Area

    The Heritage statement should include an assessment of the significance of the building / structure and the contribution of its setting to that significance. Together with an assessment of the impact of the proposal on that significance.

    The justification for the proposed demolition should also be submitted.

  • Applications either related to, or impacting on, the setting of designated heritage assets (including listed buildings, conservation areas, historic parks and gardens, historic battlefields and scheduled ancient monuments)

    The Heritage statement should include plans indicating those heritage assets whose setting is affected. There should be an assessment of the significance of the archaeological, architectural, artistic or historic interest of the designated heritage assets affected. In particular, focusing on the contribution of their setting to that significance.

    The justification for the proposed works should also be submitted.

  • Applications where the site includes, or is considered to have the potential to include, heritage assets with archaeological interest

    Applicants may be required to submit an appropriate desk-based assessment. Where desk-based research is insufficient to properly assess the interest, a field evaluation.

    For further information, visit: West Yorkshire Archaeological Services .

  • Applications affecting non-designated heritage assets

    A description may be required of the significance of the heritage assets affected and the contribution of their setting to that significance, together with an assessment of the impact of the proposal on that significance and an explanation of the justification for the works.

For details of designated heritage assets, visit: Historic England .

Please also refer to the Structural survey section, of this Local List.

Where to look for further assistance

Advice is provided in the Historic Environment Good Practice Advice planning notes listed in the Policy driver.

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Conservation team on: 01422 392265.

 

10. Land contamination assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

Where it is suspected the land or adjacent land may be contaminated due to its uses, now or in the past and ground works are proposed. For example, where the site was previously occupied by the following uses:

  • manufacturing or industrial activity;
  • chemical or fuel storage;
  • treatment or disposal of waste;
  • housing and residential institutions;
  • offices and non-residential institutions;
  • the application site is within 250 metres of a landfill site.

Then a Phase 1 desk study report must be submitted with an application for outline or full planning permission.

Note: Householder applications are excluded from this requirement.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

The Phase 1 report should include:

  • a desk study search of available historical and current records and maps. To identify potential on-site and off-site sources of contamination;
  • a site walkover survey, including: observations relating to the site’s layout, nature and setting, condition of the site and structures, visual or odorous evidence of contamination and signs of vegetation distress;
  • a preliminary conceptual site model that illustrates the potential pollutant linkages. This includes sources of any potentially significant contamination, pathways through which contaminants can travel and receptors that ultimately can be affected by the contamination, together with details of limitations and assumptions / uncertainties. The conceptual site model will enable a preliminary risk assessment to be made, which will indicate whether a Phase 2 intrusive site investigation is required.

Further information

PDFDevelopment on Land Affected by Contamination, Technical Guidance For Developers, Landowners and Consultants [PDF 656KB] , Yorkshire and Humberside Pollution Advisory Council, version 6.2 (February 2015).

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Pollution team on: 01422 392373 / 392307.

 

11. Land stability

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Developments on land known or suspected to be potentially unstable;
  • proposals for free standing retaining structures, i.e. gabion baskets;
  • proposals for the excavation of land that would affect site stability.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Unstable land identified on the Unitary Development Plan 2006 map.

What information is required

A report assessing the nature and scale of any stability problems and identifying any measures required to overcome the problems, See Further information below.

Further information

The handling of individual applications for development on land which is known or suspected to be unstable or potentially unstable will need to take account of the potential hazard that such instability could create both to the development itself and to the neighbouring area. Whilst there is scope for flexibility, and each application must be treated on its merits, it is important that the local planning authority is satisfied by the developer that any instability has been taken into account.

The causes of ground instability fall into three broad categories: the effects of underground cavities; unstable slopes; and ground compression.

Where to look for further assistance

Please seek specialist consultants advice.

 

12. Lighting assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

Proposal involves exterior lighting for sports pitches, car parks, illumination of buildings, commercial security lighting and outdoor work areas. Note: Excludes standard street lighting or similar low-level lighting.

Geographical locations where this information is required

N/A

What information is required

  • An appraisal of the need for lighting;
  • an assessment of the potential impacts, including light trespass;
  • a lighting design scheme, including horizontal and vertical illuminance measurements.

Further information

Glare and stray light from external lighting associated with development, can be held to affect local amenity, dark landscapes and nature conservation. This can be to an unacceptable degree and / or to adversely impact on the character of a Conservation area or listed building . Depending on location, applications that include proposal for external lighting can raise issues relating to glare and light pollution. Such applications need to be supported by detailed information to include:

  1. the proposed level of maintained average horizontal illuminance for the site;
  2. the predicted vertical illuminance that will be caused by lighting. Measured at the windows of any properties in the vicinity;
  3. the specification of the luminaries, including: number and location, type and rating of lamps and lamp housing design. Also, proposals to minimise, or eliminate, glare from the use of the lighting installation;
  4. the proposed hours of operation of the lighting.

For an overview of light pollution issues, visit: Guidance for the reduction in obtrusive light - GN01:2011 (Institution of Lighting Professional’s).

For larger schemes, applicants are encouraged to seek advice / guidance, visit: ILP (Institute of Lighting Professionals) .

For further guidance, with an emphasis on floodlighting relating to sports development, visit: Sports England: Artificial sports lighting .

For sources available to purchase, visit: Society of light and lighting: Lighting publications .

For issues specifically relating to the effect of lighting on bats, visit: Bat conservation trust: Lighting .

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Pollution team on: 01422 392373 / 392307 / 392311.

 

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13. Noise assessment

Policy drivers

National planning policy framework - section 11, paragraph 109 and 123.

Type of application

  • Noise sensitive developments adjacent to major roads, rail or other noise sources. For example, industrial / commercial, including car parks and service yards, eating / drinking establishments and sports fields;
  • developments that contain noise sources, whether internally or externally, which can have an impact upon existing “noise sensitive” uses;
  • mixed use developments, i.e. commercial and residential accommodation.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Noise sensitive development includes: residential developments, hospitals, schools and care homes.

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

Noise can be generated by a number of different sources, including:

  • road and rail traffic;
  • industrial and commercial processes;
  • external plant; and
  • entertainment uses, such as:
    • restaurants;
    • public houses; and
    • nightclubs, which are often at the peak of their activity in the evening, night and weekends.

Noise arises not only from within premises, but also externally from associated arrivals, departures, people noise and vehicle parking.

A noise assessment assists the Local Planning Authority in making judgments as to whether a scheme is acceptable. Developers should discuss their proposals and any need for a noise assessment with the Council at pre-planning application stage. The requirement for a noise assessment and what survey investigations should account for, will be made on a site-by-site basis. This will take account of the specifics of the proposals and the character of the area.

Regard should be taken of BS4142:2014 and BS8233:2014, or other appropriate standards where these do not apply.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Pollution team on: 01422 392373 / 392307 / 392311.

 

14. Planning obligations statement

Policy drivers

Replacement Unitary development plan - policies OS5, CF1 and GE3.

What information is required

Details of Public Open Space and Educational Provision.

Further information

N/A

Where to look for further assistance

For further information on requirements in relation to Public Open Space, educational provision and planning obligations, e-mail: planning.applications@calderdale.gov.uk .

 

15. Private water supply

Policy drivers

Type of application

New development proposals in areas where there will be an increased burden on a private water supply. This being the result of an increased maximum number of people living or working at the development.

Note: This excludes householder development, unless it involves the creation of additional bedrooms.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

The details to be submitted must identify:

  • the location and nature of the water supply source to be used (i.e. borehole, well, spring);
  • any other uses already made of the supply;
  • the location of septic tanks within 50m of the supply source and the supply distribution pipework.

If an existing private water supply is to be used, information is required for the quantity of water available, its existing use and proposed use. See Further information, below.

Further information

Adequate water must be available to serve the proposed development. For information on the approximate location of the public ‘mains’ water supply network, see: Environmental map .

You must submit written details of the private water supply for ‘domestic purposes’, to the local planning authority. This is for residential developments or places of work. ‘Domestic purposes’ includes:

  • human consumption and cooking purposes;
  • sanitation and laundry;
  • washing vehicles and watering gardens.

If an existing private water supply is to be used, information about the quantity of water available is required:

  • Measure the time taken (in seconds) to fill a bucket (of known capacity) from an overflow, or similar, of the supply to be used. Note: Do not use a tap. Ideally, perform the test during sustained dry weather, close to the site of the proposed development. Repeat the test several times and take an average of the results. Calculate the water available in 86,400 seconds (number of seconds in 24 hours).

    Example: It takes an average of 90 seconds to fill a 10 litre bucket:

    Total water available = (86,400 seconds / 90 seconds) x 10 litres = 9,600 litres / day.

  • Account for existing uses being made of the water (refer to Table 1 of BS6700: 2006, but allow 200 litres of water per head per day for a residential development). Assume maximum occupancy: 2 persons per double bedroom, 1 per single bedroom (even if used as a ‘study’).

    Example: 6 houses are already served by the supply. Each has 2 double bedrooms and 1 single bedroom. The existing water demand is 6 houses x 5 bed spaces x 200 litres per head = 6,000 litres / day. In this example there are 3,600 litres of unused water a day to support further development.

    Note: Commercial and agricultural uses of water can draw higher levels of water than are featured in BS6700.

  • Account for the extra use of that water supply proposed by the development, in accordance with Table 1 of BS 6700:2006. Allow for a minimum of 200 litres of water, per head per day, for a residential development. Always assume maximum occupancy.

    Example: A new house will have 1 double and 2 single bedrooms and a study the size of a single bedroom. 5 bed spaces x 200 litres each = 1,000 litres. In this example there is sufficient water to meet that demand out of the 3,600 litres of unused water available.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone an Environmental Health Officer on: 01422 392373 / 392307 / 392311.

 

16. Structural survey

Policy drivers

Type of application

Applications for the conversion of buildings in greenbelt or countryside. To demonstrate that they are capable of conversion, without major or complete reconstruction.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

Report provided by a suitably qualified person.

Further information

Where an application seeks Listed buildings consent for structural alterations that would affect the significance of these heritage assets. Information is required that is proportionate to the significance of the asset and the potential impact upon that significance of the proposals.

For example: For a substantial demolition, the applicant is expected to provide detailed information on the asset as a whole. Also, a thorough explanation of the impact is required.

An application for a minor alteration to part of the asset may only require detailed information on the affected part of the asset. In addition, a brief explanation of how the impacts relate to the significance of the asset as a whole.

For further information, see: Heritage statement (section 9 on this Local list) and visit: Historic England: Good practice advice notes . See Policy drivers, above.

Where to look for further assistance

A structural engineer.

 

17. Surface water drainage assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

Operational development of 100 square metres or over that creates a need for the disposal of surface water.

For example, where a new roof is being created or the ground is being covered by a non-permeable surface.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Any area of Calderdale.

What information is required

Confirmation that a feasible and, where necessary, consented surface water drainage scheme which satisfies national and local guidance has been demonstrated. This report should form part of the Flood Risk Assessment where one is required. Where a Flood Risk Assessment is not required, questions 11-20 of the PDFSurface water drainage self assessment form [PDF 109KB] should be completed.

Further information

  • The National planning policy framework - technical guidance  states that, developers should seek opportunities for sustainable drainage systems within application sites, to reduce flood risk. These should be incorporated within the layout and form of the development. Sustainable drainage systems should be considered in preference to connections to watercourses or sewers;
  • Information on sustainable drainage systems for managing surface water are set out in Chapter 7 (‘Managing Surface Water’) of the extant Development and flood risk practice guide: planning policy statement 25 ;
  • All new buildings need separate connections to foul and storm / surface water sewers. If an application proposes to connect a development to the existing drainage system then details of the existing system should be shown on the application drawing(s). It should be noted that in most circumstances surface water is not permitted to be connected to the public foul sewers;
  • An application should indicate how the development connects to existing utility infrastructure systems. The main planning issue arising is whether the provision of services on site would give rise to any environmental impacts, for example, excavations in the vicinity of trees, archaeological remains, pollution prevention and flood risk;
  • Where it is proposed to hard-surface an existing domestic garden, information is required about the proposed surfacing materials and drainage methods. For further information, visit: Environmental Agency: Permeable surfacing of front gardens - guidance .

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Drainage Engineer on: 01422 392168.

 

18. Telecommunications

Policy drivers

Type of application

Telecommunications applications.

Geographical locations where this information is required

Where relevant.

What information is required

  • A signed declaration that the equipment and installation fully complies with the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) requirements. Also, confirmation of site type (i.e. macro or micro);
  • the outcome of consultations with organisations with an interest in the proposed development. In particular, with the relevant body where a mast is to be installed near a school or college. Also, if within a statutory safeguarding zone surrounding an aerodrome or technical site;
  • for an addition to an existing mast or base station. A statement that self-certifies that the cumulative exposure, when operational, will not exceed International Commission on non-ionising radiation protection guidelines;
  • details of alternative sites rejected with a justification for rejecting them. This should include existing masts, structures and other buildings within the search area.

Further information

Visit: Code of best practice on mobile phone network development .

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Duty Planning Officer on: 01422 392237.

 

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19. Town centre uses - impact assessment

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Retail and leisure developments that are:
    • over 2,500 square metres gross; and
    • located outside a designated town centre; and
    • not in accordance with an up-to-date development plan.
  • Retail and leisure developments that are:
    • less than 2,500 square metres gross; and
    • located outside a designated town centre; and
    • not in accordance with the development plan; and
    • likely to have a significant effect on other town centres;
  • Main town centre uses (as defined by the National planning policy framework) in an existing centre that are:
    • not in accordance with the development plan; and
    • would substantially increase the attraction to the centre, to an extent that the development could impact on other centres.

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required (see Type of application, above).

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

The National planning policy framework defines main town centre uses as follows:

  • Retail development (including warehouse clubs and factory outlet centres);
  • leisure, entertainment facilities, the more intensive sport and recreation uses (including cinemas, restaurants, drive-through restaurants, bars and pubs, nightclubs, casinos, health and fitness clubs, indoor bowling centres, and bingo halls);
  • offices; and
  • arts, culture and tourism development (including theatres, museums, galleries and concert halls, hotels and conference facilities).

National planning policy framework paragraphs 26 and 27 outline the key considerations for an impact assessment and when applications should be refused.

Planning for town centres: practice guidance on need, impact and the sequential approach  (Dec 2009), sets out the main town centre uses to which the policy applies and the key considerations for which applicants should present evidence. The level and type of evidence and analysis required to address the key considerations should be proportionate to the scale and nature of the proposal. A checklist for scoping impact assessments is set out on page 60.

In addition, it is worth noting that information relating to the likely impact of a use may be required for other town centre uses of differing scales, during the life of an application, commensurate with Policy TPE5 (Preferred Options, Core Strategy October 2012) and that if this Policy is adopted, these requirements may be included on the Local List:

Policy TPE5

Retail impact assessments and local thresholds: Proposals located on the edge, or outside, of a retail centre's defined primary shopping area, will be subject to a retail impact assessment, if they exceed the following floorspace thresholds:

Impact assessment thresholds on new gross floorspace

Centre Convenience goods Comparison goods
Halifax 2,000 square metres 2,500 square metres
Brighouse 850 square metres 750 square metres
Todmorden 300 square metres 300 square metres
Hebden Bridge 150 square metres 400 square metres
Sowerby Bridge 300 square metres 100 square metres
Elland 100 square metres 200 square metres
All other centres All All

 

The assessment should consider the following impacts on all centres located within the anticipated catchment area of the new development:

  • all relevant impacts set out in national planning policy;
  • whether the proposal is of an appropriate scale in relation to the size, role and character of the settlement, or intended catchment area;
  • the cumulative impact of the proposal and other similar outstanding permissions or recent completions;
  • where the catchment area of the proposed development includes a Calderdale markets location, the specific predicted impact on market trading; and
  • for major applications, the above impacts should be assessed 10 years from the time the application is made.

All applications to remove restrictions on the type of goods sold in out-of-centre retail warehouse locations, should undertake an impact assessment.

Note: Where any proposal is likely to have a significant adverse impact on a defined centre, it will be refused.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, phone the Spatial Planning team on: 01422 392380.

 

20. Transport assessment and statement

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Major development proposals likely to have a significant transport impact on the existing transport network;
  • the following document (or any that supercedes it) from the Department of Transport provides more guidance on when a transport assessment is required: Threshold guidance for transport assessments .

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required.

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

The National planning policy framework, states that a transport statement or assessment (TA) should be submitted as part of any planning application for developments that generate significant amount of movements. The coverage and detail of the TA should reflect the scale of the development and the extent of the transport implications of the proposal.

For smaller schemes, the TA should simply outline the transport aspects of the application. While for major proposals, the TA should illustrate accessibility to the site by all modes of transport. Also, the likely modal split of journeys to and from the site. It should give details of proposed measures to improve access by public transport, walking and cycling. To reduce the need for parking associated with the proposal and to mitigate transport impacts. For further guidance, visit: Guidance on transport assessments . This includes, at Appendix B page 47, the thresholds for TAs. (which can be either speculative and non-speculative).

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact Highways on: 01422 392968.

 

21. Travel plan

Policy drivers

Type of application

  • Major development proposals, which are likely to have significant transport implications, such as:
    • schools and educational establishments;
    • public buildings;
    • employment retail and leisure uses; and
    • residential schemes, including homes for the elderly or student accommodation;

 

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required.

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

A travel plan should be submitted alongside planning applications that are likely to have significant transport implications, as advised by the National planning policy framework  , paragraph 36.

Further advice is available in:

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact Highways on: 01422 392968.

 

22. Tree survey / arboricultural report

Policy drivers

Type of application

Development proposals where one or more trees would be affected.

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required.

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

  • Where trees are within the application site, or overhanging it (including street trees), information is required on the health / condition of the trees and which trees are to be removed or retained;
  • details are required on the means of protecting the retained trees during construction. Plans need to show any retained trees in relation to the proposed development. This information should be prepared by a qualified arboriculturist;
  • there may be a requirement to submit bat and breeding bird surveys. Please read the requirements under Biodiversity / Geodiversity (section 3).

Full guidance on the survey information, protection plan and method statement that should be provided with an application can be found using current British Standard (BS) 5837 'Trees in relation to design, demolition and construction – Recommendations'. Using the methodology set out in the British Standard should help ensure that development is suitably integrated with trees and potential conflicts are avoided. This information should be prepared by a qualified arboriculturist.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact the Tree Officer on: 01422 392218.

 

23. Ventilation and extraction statement

Policy drivers

Type of application

Developments (especially those within Use classes A3, A4 and A5) and mixed use developments, where extraction equipment for the sale / preparation of cooked food or an air extraction system is to be installed.

Note: This does not include air conditioning equipment.

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required.

What information is required

See Further information, below.

Further information

Details of the position and design of ventilation and extraction equipment is required to accompany all applications for the use of premises for purposes within Use classes listed below. This includes odour abatement techniques and acoustic noise characteristics:

  • A3 (i.e. restaurants and cafes – used for the sale of food and drink for consumption on the premises);
  • A4 (i.e. drinking establishments – used as a public house, wine-bar or other drinking establishment);
  • A5 (i.e. hot food takeaways – used for the sale of hot food for consumption off the premises);
  • B1 (general business);
  • B2 (general industrial).

This information (excluding odour abatement techniques unless specifically required) will also be required for retail, business, industrial, leisure or other similar developments where ventilation or extraction equipment is proposed to be installed.

For all applications for the installation of air extraction system equipment, details of the position and design of the equipment, including acoustic noise characteristics and external ductwork will be required.

For further guidance on eating establishments, visit: Guidance on the control of odour and noise from commercial kitchen exhaust .

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact the Pollution team on: 01422 392307 / 392373 / 392311.

 

24. Wind energy application

Policy drivers

Type of application

All wind turbine applications.

Geographical locations where this information is required

As required.

What information is required

See the following Further information. There are differing requirements, depending on the size of the turbine.

Further information

The checklist requirement for wind energy is intended to provide greater certainty to applicants concerning the requirements for planning applications for wind turbines. Setting out the information that will be needed to determine the level of impact. This will enable a consistent approach to the determination of such applications by the Council.

Please note: Where the document refers to turbine height, this is the maximum height to the blade tip, not the height of the mast or tower.

For all wind turbine applications:

  1. Noise, 'shadow flicker' and light reflection assessment

    The applicant should submit an evidenced noise assessment that confirms either, that the decibel level at the nearest third party property will not exceed 35 decibels (A-weighted) at 10 metres / second wind speed or, that the turbine noise impact when assessed against the background noise meets the requirements of Good practice guide to wind turbine noise , taking account of the latest industry good practice and any guidance on best practice that the Government may from time to time publish.

    To avoid giving rise to shadow flicker effect, turbines should be located at a distance of at least 10 x the rotor diameter from dwellings within 130 degrees either side of north from the turbine position.

    Angle of possible shadow from a wind turbine

    Where it is to be argued that topography or another feature permits closer siting of a turbine, the Council will expect a report to be submitted which calculates and assesses the impact of shadow flicker from this development, and measures to mitigate that impact.

    Shadow flicker effects on horses using bridleways within a radius of 10 x rotor diameter should also be addressed. Such reports should be carried out by a suitably qualified person or organisation, and set out clear recommendations.

    Light reflection is influenced by the surface finish of the turbine blades. Details should be submitted to indicate the proposed finish designed to mitigate the impact of light reflection.

  2. Decommissioning

    An indication of how decommissioning will be undertaken, once the turbine(s) has reached the end of it’s operational life. With a larger scheme this could be dealt with through a unilateral undertaking. This may be necessary to prevent redundant wind turbines from remaining in the landscape once the end of their operating life has been reached, and acts as a safeguard in case of any financial constraints which may prevent the owner / operator of the turbine(s) from carrying out decommissioning works in future.

In addition, where a wind turbine will be 25 metres or more in height, these should be submitted:

  1. Peat and hydrology assessment

    Peat is recognised as an important store of carbon, which if damaged can dry out leading to oxidisation of stored carbon, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Poor siting of turbines risks damaging peat and undermining the role of wind turbines in providing energy with low carbon emissions. Peat also plays an important role in retaining water on Calderdale’s moorlands, helping to prevent flooding further down in the valleys following periods of heavy rainfall. In order to conserve these peatlands, the Council will expect applications for single wind turbines over a height of 25m (or multiple turbines of any height) to identify whether peat exists on the site and demonstrate how the turbine(s) has been sited to avoid it – including details of measures proposed to avoid damage to underlying peat by any proposed access tracks. Where peat is identified on site, the Council reserves the right to request further investigation to determine its extent.

    The Council will also expect applications to demonstrate how the construction of any foundations access tracks or trenches for cables will be achieved without substantially altering the hydrological regime of the site – ie how tracks, trenches and any other associated infrastructure have been designed and sited to avoid draining peat and avoid creating new channels for surface water to run off the site. Disturbance to underlying peat by wind turbines has the potential to cause adverse impacts on the quantity, quality and colour of water supplies which are replenished by water draining from moorlands. Where underlying peat is identified on site, the Council will expect applications to demonstrate how adverse impacts on the quantity, quality and colour of any potentially affected water supplies will be avoided.

  2. Landscape, and visual and cumulative impact assessment

    This should include a landscape and visual impact assessment which demonstrates how visual impacts have been minimised / mitigated and how the proposed turbine(s) will fit into the landscape. The assessment should include details of the following:

    • Alternative sites which have been considered for the development;
    • alternative turbine amounts / layouts / configurations which have been considered;
    • alternative turbine heights / models / appearances which have been considered;
    • alternative access arrangements / routes which have been considered;
    • landscaping arrangements which have been considered to mitigate the visual / landscape impact of the propose turbine(s).

    For each of the above, it should be clearly demonstrated why the chosen arrangements represent the best option in terms of visual and landscape impact minimisation.

    The cumulative visual impact of the proposed turbine(s) with other existing operational or permitted turbines, or turbines currently subject to a planning application should be fully addressed in the Landscape and visual impact assessment. Landscape and visual impact assessments should make reference to the PDFSouth Pennines wind energy landscape study [PDF 9123KB] (Julie Martin Associates, 2010) .

    The Council will also expect applications to include an assessment of the impacts of the proposed turbine(s) on significant cultural, recreational or heritage assets which could potentially be affected. This should include any potential sub-surface archaeological issues. For turbines with a total height of under 40 metres, this should cover assets within a minimum radius of ten x turbine height (the Council reserves the right to request an assessment of the impacts on significant assets outside this radius if it is deemed necessary). For proposed turbines with a total height of 40 metres or above, the assessment should extend to significant assets within a radius of 5 kilometres of the nearest boundary of the site. For schemes of greater than 100 metres total height, the 5 kilometre distance may be extended. Cultural assets may include Listed buildings, Conservation areas, archaeological assets, Scheduled ancient monuments, parks and public gardens, recreation areas, cemeteries and any other nearby assets which could potentially suffer harm due to the presence of wind turbines.

  3. Planning statement

    A statement should be included with the application to demonstrate how the proposed scheme fits into the current national, regional and local planning policy context.

  4. Photomontages and wireframe diagrams

    The Council will expect all wind turbine applications to be accompanied by a representative range of photomontages and / or wireframe diagrams to demonstrate how the proposed turbine(s), ancillary equipment and access roads will fit into the landscape. Photomontages and wireframe diagrams should be created by a suitably qualified person or organisation.

    Locations for photomontage and wireframe diagram viewpoints should be agreed with the Council at the pre-submission stage.

  5. Zone of theoretical visibility (ZTV) maps

    Unless the application is for a single turbine with a height of 25 metres or less (which is not within 1 kilometre of any other operational or permitted turbines, or turbines currently subject to a planning application), the Council will expect applications to be accompanied by two Ordnance Survey based maps showing the ZTV of the proposed turbine(s):

    • The first of the maps should show the ZTV of the proposed turbine(s) only;
    • the second map should show the cumulative ZTV of the proposed turbine(s) along with any other operational and permitted turbines (and those currently subject to a planning application).

    Applicants should contact the Council to obtain an up to date list of such turbines

    The radius of the ZTV maps required depends on the proposed height of the turbine(s) in the application and other factors. In addition, any recognised long distance recreational routes or recreational routes of local significance (eg the Calderdale way, the Pennine way, etc) should be plotted on the ZTV maps. If the ZTV maps indicate that the proposed turbine(s) will be visible from along such recreational routes, the applicant will be expected to provide photomontages showing the predicted view of the turbine(s) from points along the route. This may include an assessment of sequential visibility. The exact location of such photomontage viewpoints should be agreed with the Council at the pre-submission stage.

  6. Public rights of way

    The Council will expect a plan to be submitted which identifies all public rights of way within a radius of 10 x turbine height from the centre of the turbine. The impact on locally and sub-regionally significant or recreational routes or long distance trails should be fully addressed where the turbine(s) will be located within 1 kilometre of such a route. Such routes could include the Pennine bridleway, the Pennine way and the Calderdale way, etc. Other routes exist however, and applicants are advised to contact the Public rights of way team (telephone 01422 288002) for clarification where they are unsure if such a route exists in proximity to the proposed turbine(s).

  7. Ecological assessment

    The Council will expect a clear methodology to be followed – a preliminary desk-based assessment should be carried out to determine whether or not there is a need for further more detailed ecological investigation. The desk-based assessment should include information on nearby locally or nationally designated ecology or bio-diversity assets, protected species and habitats, and should demonstrate how the proposed wind turbine(s) will avoid causing harm.

    Where the desk-based exercise concludes that further ecological investigation is required, the Council will require clear evidence of an ecological survey by a suitably qualified and experienced person or organisation, which addresses the site-specific issues identified and provides clear recommendations. To avoid doubt and clarify the requirements for individual proposals, applicants are recommended to contact the Council at pre-application stage.

    • For sites within 1 kilometre of the South Pennine Moors special protection area, and any other sites with records of notable bird species, the following guidance applies: Bird risk maps and guidance ;
    • for sites close to bat roosts or foraging habitats, the following guidance applies: Planning issues: bats .
  8. Socio-economic benefits statement

    Applicants for wind energy developments with a total generating capacity of 250 kilowatts or above should indicate how consideration has been given to offsetting the impact of the development on the local community.

    Best practice guidance exists for applicants on community benefits, see: Renewable UK: Community benefits protocol .

  9. Telecommunications and radar statement

    The Council will consult the Ministry of Defence (Defence Infrastructure Organisation) and National Air Traffic Services (NATS) on wind turbine applications. As such, there is no requirement for applicants to consult with these two bodies prior to submission of an application.

    However, it is the responsibility of the applicant to demonstrate that the proposed turbine(s) will not cause any interference to the operation of any communications or broadcast equipment, through consultation with the operators of any masts or antennae which may be subject to adverse effects from the proposed turbine(s). Consultation responses from any such individuals or organisations should be submitted to the Council alongside the planning application. Applicants should also demonstrate that any possible effects on telecommunications equipment, including television reception, have been considered and if necessary mitigation measures taken.

Where to look for further assistance

If you are not sure what information to submit, contact the Pollution Control team on: 01422 392307 / 392373 / 392311.

 

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